The Bolivarian Revolution is an ongoing movement in Venezuela which began with the election of Hugo Chávez in 1998. The movement seeks to nationalize industries and implement social welfare programs to improve the lives of the people of Venezuela and eliminate the United States’s control of Venezuela’s resources. In 2002, after Hugo Chávez was democratically elected as President of Venezuela for the second time, the U.S. backed opposition attempted to oust President Chávez from office. Despite being arrested after refusing to resign, President Chávez was reinstated after a wave of rallies against the coup, with popular support from the working people of Venezuela, labour unions, and lower ranking members of the military. This attempted coup d'état is further evidence of the United States’s propensity to forgo democracy in order to maintain economic hegemony.

In April 2013, Nicolás Maduro was elected as the President of Venezuela after Chávez’s death, and immediately continued Chávez’s work of creating better conditions for workers and supporting the people of Venezuela. When Maduro was elected and inaugurated for his second term in January 2019, he was met with right-wing opposition, including U.S. backed puppet Juan Guaidó who declared himself the true president of Venezuela. Maduro responded by cutting political relations with the U.S. and calling for an evacuation of the U.S. embassy. The U.S. then proceeded to impose more sanctions on Venezuela, as well as withholding important supplies for the people of Venezuela and threats of war. The U.S. has also backed Colombia and prevented aid from being sent across the Colombian border to Venezuela. However, Maduro and the people of Venezuela continue to remain persistent against the threats of U.S. intervention and war, showing that the people support Maduro and the Bolivarian revolution. In response to these developments Students for a Democratic Society has stood firm against U.S. military intervention in Venezuela and resolutely supports the Venezuelan people’s right to sovereignty and their struggle against U.S. aggression and economic sanctions. This includes local and national rallies with the message, “U.S. Hands Off Venezuela!”, as well as efforts to dispel misinformation spread by the opposition controlled, private Venezuelan media and corporate owned U.S. media.

SDS will stand in solidarity with the people of Venezuela by having a national day of action.

All chapters should aim to have a solidarity event by the end of Spring semester in solidarity with the Venezuelan people and their right to sovereignty from the U.S.

Chapters should continue to dispel misinformation spread through the U.S. media by sharing relevant news articles on their social media platforms